Importing frequency band info using tdableton

Is there a way of importing frequency data with tdableton so I can use different frequency bands to control different parameters in touch (eg 20 hz, 100 hz 500 hz etc etc). Maybe using an eq 8 on the master bus… Or something? I noticed there’s a TDA audio analyzer object in Ableton - but I don’t know how to get the data of the different frequency nads back in to touch?

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Yes, I’m curious if there is help too… I’m a noob and curious how to convert that RMS info from TDableton to spectral info then using it with different TOPs. I can’t seem to find anything on the forums so far.

Did this the other day. Couldn’t find a way using the tdableton components. I ended up just routing sound out of ableton with virtual audio cables using the Audio Device In CHOP. Had to use a couple different tools to finally get it to work. Not really an elegant solution but it worked eventually. I think it’s easier to route audio on mac.

Here’s a link to the final output if you’re at all interested: https://www.instagram.com/p/CAJrd1vlx38/
The use of frequency is a little convoluted. Basically just used the frequency data to change the normal map of the PBR I was using.

If you’re on Windows, VB-Audio has some interesting tools to be able to route sound virtually. It ended up getting the job done for me. Good luck! Maybe you can find a better solution than I did.

The abletonLevel component in rack mode lets you use whatever audio effects you want to grab frequency bands. The default rack has a simple high/mid/low filter but you can build whatever you want to break out the bandwidths. There’s an example in the abletonDemo.toe.

https://docs.derivative.ca/TDAbleton_System_Components#abletonLevel

Yes… I basically figured it out after writing this and watching a few more tutorials. I feel both proud and kind of silly. I tried the mapping the different values of my master track (with the default rack/analyzer/eq), merged the three bands, smoothed it with a filter, then mapped those values on a noise: